The BBC Computer Literacy Project Archive now Online


In the 1980s, the BBC explored the world of computing in The Computer Literacy Project. They commissioned a home computer (the BBC Micro) and taught viewers how to program.

The Computer Literacy Project chronicled a decade of information technology and was a milestone in the history of computing in Britain, helping to inspire a generation of coders.

The site contains all 146 of the original Computer Literacy Project programmes plus 121 related programmes, broken down into 2,509 categorised, searchable clips.

Source: The BBC Computer Literacy Project Archive

Nintendo NES Built-in Screen Project

Nintendo Age forum member Silius has made an awesome modification on the first Nintendo console. He’s kept the case looking perfectly normal, and the machine plays cartridges perfectly — but the entire thing is hinged horizontally, opening up like a treasure chest to reveal an LCD screen that displays the games.

The First Video Game Easter Egg

Adventure was conceived as a graphical version of the 1977 text adventure Colossal Cave Adventure. It took developer Warren Robinett approximately one year to design and code the game, during which time he had to overcome a variety of technical limitations in the Atari 2600 console hardware, as well as difficulties with management within Atari. In this game, he introduced the first widely known video game Easter egg, a secret room containing text crediting himself for the game’s creation. Robinett’s Easter egg became a tradition for future Atari 2600 titles.